Seminars

Seminar teaching sessions are aligned with didactic topics.  Residents will have protected time to attend the seminar series, case conferences, Journal Club, Grand Rounds, and Morbidity and Mortality conferences. The seminar sessions are designed to augment training residents receive on individual clinical services by ensuring comprehensive instruction in psychopathology, evaluation and diagnosis, psychopharmacology, diverse psychotherapies, neuroscience and genetics, sociocultural aspects of mental illness, and ethical and legal concerns.  Throughout, faculty will emphasize concepts of evidence-based medicine.  Residents also will present formally during some sessions and receive feedback on presentation skills.

To fulfill their broad medical training requirements, PGY1 residents will have rotations on services other than psychiatry.  During these rotations, the residents will participate in the didactic programs of the host services.  To ensure the residents’ complete psychiatric education, seminars presented below that residents may have missed while rotating on other services will be made available to them when they are on the psychiatry service.

All seminar sessions will be four hours long, with three short intermissions.  They will be conducted weekly throughout the calendar year, with exceptions for major federal holidays and major professional meetings.  The schedule for each year is as follows:

 

PGY1 Seminars

Seminars in the PGY1 year are designed to provide a broad, practical overview of the major elements of psychiatric practice to provide residents a working knowledge of key skills they require in encounters with patients.  All require compulsory attendance.

  • Orientation to Psychiatry – Joseph Vlaskovits MD, Leslie Horton MD, Robert Rubin MD, PhD
    The seminar provides an overview of the psychiatrist’s identity as a practitioner of holistic, psychological medicine.  Topics include holistic concepts of human functioning (e.g., bio-psycho-social-spiritual model); required balance of learned professional skills; the patient-physician relationship; history taking; family and other contacts; psychiatric diagnostics; bio-psycho-social treatment formulation; therapeutic practice, including all relevant modalities; and the psychiatrist as multidisciplinary mental-health team leader.  Physician-psychiatrist wellness and growth will be emphasized as trainees encounter the complexity and intensity of severe and persistent mental illness in the acute hospital setting.  Ethics and professionalism in psychiatric practice will also be stressed – thorough documentation of patient encounters and review of American Medical Association and American Psychiatric Association Codes of Medical Ethics, clinician/patient boundary violations, confidentiality and HIPAA compliance, relationships with commercial enterprises (e.g., Pharma), and academic/research ethics.  This seminar will prepare residents for the Professional Development / Transition to Practice seminars.  20 hours (5 sessions).
  • Emergency Psychiatry – Theodore Huzyk MD, Jason Cooper MD, Heather Lewerenz MD, Joseph Vlaskovits MD
    The purpose is to quickly orient new residents to the Ventura County Medical Center (VCMC) Crisis Stabilization Unit (CSU), a central location for the evaluation of emergency psychiatric patients from all areas of Ventura County.  Residents will evaluate a broad spectrum of patients, providing direct clinical experience in parallel with first-year didactics including evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment.  Didactic topics include rapid resolution of crises; e.g., aggression, delirium, through interpersonal contact and medication management; the phases of crisis resolution and appropriately adjusting the mix of therapeutic modalities; re-evaluation of the stable patient; gleaning family and other collateral information; post-CSU planning and disposition; and legal aspects of involuntary holds/commitments.  16 hours (4 sessions).
  • Psychopathology and Psychiatric Diagnosis – Joseph Vlaskovits MD, Leslie Horton MD, PhD, Robert Rubin MD, PhD
    How to take a psychiatric history, including when to listen, when to speak, and how to ask questions of the patient, will be the first topic in this series.  The Mental Status Examination, the central component of the psychiatric diagnostic evaluation, will be presented in detail.  The American Psychiatric Association Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), Fifth Edition, will be used as the structure for consideration of the three major categories of psychopathology (disorders of thinking, feeling, and behaving).  A brief history of the DSMs will be given to highlight the transition between descriptive (DSMs I and II) and criterion-based (DSMs III, IV, and 5) diagnoses.  DSM-5 as a guide to diagnosis and treatment, rather than as dogma, will be discussed, along with the perspective of the medical humanities in understanding historical and cultural factors shaping diagnostic systems.  Additional uses of DSM-5 for statistical aggregation of diagnoses (e.g., in epidemiological studies), insurance payments, etc., will be discussed.  The ~20 diagnostic categories given in DSM-5 (neurodevelopmental disorders, schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders, etc.) will be presented individually in overview to provide a beginning orientation to these categories.  Each category will be introduced by discussion of relevant aspects of normal psychological development.  Cultural concepts of distress relevant to each category will be emphasized.  As well, special considerations in each category; e.g., suicide as a potential outcome of affective (and sometimes psychotic) disorders will be highlighted.  Residents will gain considerably more experience with DSM-5 throughout all their residency rotations and activities.  40 hours (10 sessions).
  • Psychological Testing – Psychology faculty and outside experts as needed.
    The use of psychological assessment as an empirically validated method to assess personality traits, psychopathological symptoms and syndromes, and neuropsychological (cognitive) function will be discussed. Major categories of standardized psychological testing for adults will include personality/psychopathology tests such as the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2, Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory, and Personality Assessment Inventory; and neuropsychological tests for assessing several domains of cognitive function, such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, the Mini-Mental State Examination, and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment.  Alignment of psychological test results with DSM-5 diagnoses will be emphasized.  8 hours (2 sessions).
  • Introduction to Psychopharmacology – Joseph Vlaskovits MD, Jason Cooper MD, Heather Lewerenz MD, Robert Rubin MD, PhD
    The purpose is to provide an overview of the major classes of psychopharmaceutical agents currently in use.  These include antipsychotics, antidepressants, antianxiety agents, mood stabilizers (lithium and anti-epileptic agents), hypnotics, stimulants, and cognitive enhancers.  The concept of broad use of different classes of drugs for multiple diagnoses will be emphasized; e.g., use of antidepressants to treat anxiety, use of antipsychotics as adjuncts to treat mood disorders, use of sedating antidepressants as hypnotics, etc.  Drug-drug interactions, both among psychopharmacologic agents and between these agents and other classes of drugs, and major adverse events; e.g., neuroleptic malignant syndrome, will be emphasized.  The genetic underpinnings of drug metabolism and interactions and their effects on therapeutic response will be considered.  So-called neutriceuticals; e.g., St John’s wort, especially their limited efficacies, will be discussed in the context of complementary medicine.  Of importance, the concepts of evidence-based medicine will be considered with each class of medications discussed; e.g., the strength of therapeutic effect versus placebo and comparison drugs and the strength of drug-drug interactions as established in the medical literature.  40 hours (10 sessions).
  • Introduction to Somatic Therapies – Joseph Vlaskovits MD, and outside experts.
    The purpose is to provide an overview of the spectrum of somatic therapies now being used in psychiatry, including electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), transcranial magnetic stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation.  Indications for these treatments, for example for severe and intractable depression and catatonia, will be emphasized.  8 hours (2 sessions).
  • Introduction to Psychotherapies – Leslie Horton MD, PhD, Ronald Bale PhD, Ronda Doonan PsyD, Daniel Powell MA, LMFT
    The purpose is to provide an overview of the spectrum of psychotherapies now being used in psychiatry to aid residents in developing therapeutic skills in psychotherapy.  The unique role of psychotherapy in the practice of psychological medicine will be emphasized, including understanding key elements of ego defense mechanisms and transference and countertransference. PGY1 residents will learn to formulate a psychological assessment of patients adapted for the inpatient setting, using elements of ego psychology, object relations theory, and self-psychology, and they will develop psychotherapeutic skills based on solution-focused and supportive psychotherapy, techniques appropriate for inpatients.  Fundamental topics include the following:  what is psychotherapy, basic psychodynamic theory, ego psychology/defense mechanisms, transference and countertransference, learning/behavioral therapies, supportive therapy, and psychosocial rehabilitation.  Couples, family, and group therapies will be presented.  Of importance, concepts of evidence-based medicine will be considered with each class of therapy discussed; e.g., the consistency of therapeutic effect versus no treatment or “treatment as usual” as established in the medical literature.  Psychotherapeutic techniques relevant to outpatients in various settings will be taught in later years.  40 hours (10 sessions).
  • Professional Development / Transition to Practice – All faculty.
    The emphasis of this residency program is on training psychiatrists to meet the needs of Ventura County mental health programs.  As such, the role of the psychiatrist in these programs will be considered from the standpoint of both practicing clinician and administrator/team leader.  This seminar series will be carried through all four postgraduate years, with greater frequency in PGY4.  In later years, post-residency opportunities in public institutions and clinics will be discussed in detail, including both clinical and administrative positions.  Opportunities and challenges in private practice, academic and educational settings, and careers in basic and clinical research will be considered.  8 hours (2 sessions).
  • PRITE Review Course – All faculty.  12 hours (3 sessions).

PGY2 Seminars

Seminars in the PGY2 year are aligned with the subspecialty rotations in the PGY2 year and are designed to provide an in-depth exposure to these subspecialties, in accord with the time spent on each of the rotations.  All require compulsory attendance.

  • Adult Inpatient Psychiatry/Crisis Stabilization Unit (CSU) –Leslie Horton MD, PhD, Theodore Huzyk, MD, Heather Lewerenz MD, Joseph Vlaskovits MD, Jason Cooper MD
    This seven-month rotation (six months inpatient, one-month CSU) will afford the opportunity to consider major mental illnesses in depth, including severity needed to require hospitalization. Such illnesses include depressive disorders with prominent suicidal ideation, psychotic disorders with prominent disorganization of thought (and often attendant disorganized behavior), impulse-control/conduct disorders, and, of course, substance use disorders, often co-morbid with the aforementioned illnesses.  The major elements of psychiatric practice presented in the PGY1 seminars will be covered again in these PGY2 seminars but with a focus on particular illnesses as exemplified by particular patients.  In addition to didactic presentations from faculty, residents will be asked to present their patients, with citation of relevant medical literature, for discussion in a group process.  40 hours (10 sessions).
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry – Deborah Thurber MD, Richard Ha DO
    First, a brief overview of normal infant, child, and adolescent physical and psychological development will be presented. Second, the diagnosis and management of neurodevelopmental disorders will be considered, including inter alia, intellectual disabilities, communication disorders, autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, motor disorders, and tic disorders.  Third, the manifestations of major mental illness (psychotic, affective, behavioral, and personality disorders) in children and adolescents and special approaches to treatment in these age groups will be discussed.  Finally, diagnostic, treatment, and legal aspects of child abuse will be presented.  40 hours (10 sessions).
  • Consultation-Liaison (C/L) Psychiatry – Theodore Huzyk, MD, Jason Cooper MD, Joseph Vlaskovits MD
    The purpose is to provide an overview of the consultative help that psychiatrists can provide to patients hospitalized on non-psychiatric services; e.g., medicine, surgery, and pediatrics, as well as outpatient referrals of medically ill patients from non-psychiatric clinicians.  Psychiatric presentations in medically ill patients are a prime consideration in C/L psychiatry and form the core of this series.  A major emphasis in C/L psychiatry is the interaction of the psychiatrist with all members of the clinical team – non-psychiatric physicians, ward nurses, medical social workers, et al.  Awareness of mental health issues among these ward staff often needs to be addressed, and the C/L psychiatrist has a teaching role in this area, as well as having a direct consultant role with the patient.  40 hours (10 sessions).
  • Geriatric Psychiatry – Joseph Vlaskovits MD, Debra London MD, outside experts
    The purpose is to provide in-depth understanding of psychiatric problems of the elderly, including the impact of failing physical health and cognitive decline.  Diagnostic approaches to neuropsychiatric problems of the elderly will be emphasized, including specialized neurocognitive testing and brain imaging.  Differentiation of dementias; e.g., Alzheimer’s vs frontotemporal dementia, and their behavioral attributes will be considered.  Treatments for cognitive decline, both pharmacological and psychological/educational, will be discussed.  20 hours (5 sessions).
  • Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders – Joseph Vlaskovits MD, Tipu Khan MD
    The purpose is to provide an overview of classes of drugs of abuse, including opiates, stimulants, hallucinogens, etc.  The antecedents (e.g., pain, trauma), diagnosis, and management of both acute intoxication and chronic abuse for each of these classes of drugs will be considered.  The frequent comorbidities of substance use disorders and other major mental illnesses will be presented.  Legal aspects discussed will include federal and state requirements for prescribing FDA scheduled drugs, DEA enforcement of these requirements, sanctions against persons who are illicit drug users, and iatrogenic contributions to addictions in patients.  Abuse of legal substances, including alcohol and marijuana, will be considered as well.  20 hours (5 sessions).
  • Professional Development / Transition to Practice – All faculty.
    The role of the psychiatrist will be considered from the standpoint of both practicing clinician and administrator/team leader in the context of the needs of Ventura County mental health programs.  This seminar series will be a longitudinal series through all four postgraduate years, with greater focus in the PGY4 year.  In later years, post-residency opportunities in public institutions and clinics will be discussed in detail, including both clinical and administrative positions.  Opportunities and challenges in private practice, academic and educational settings, and careers in basic and clinical research will be considered.  20 hours (5 sessions).
  • PRITE Review Course – All faculty.  12 hours (3 sessions).

PGY3 Seminars

The PGY3 year is entirely an outpatient adult and child psychiatry experience, with rotations through psychiatric outpatient clinics at Ventura County Behavioral Health and Community Memorial Health System.  Seminars in the PGY3 year are designed to provide in-depth exposure to the elements of psychiatric practice needed to work with outpatients in various clinic settings.  Residents will encounter a broad spectrum of psychiatric diagnoses and illness severity, which will be addressed both in seminars and individual case presentations.  All require compulsory attendance.

  • Advanced Topics in Biological Psychiatry and Psychopharmacology; Seminars and Case Conferences – Joseph Vlaskovits MD, Jason Cooper MD, Robert Rubin MD, PhD
    Fundamental aspects of neurochemistry and neurophysiology will be presented, including theories of neurotransmitter and brain network dysfunction in major mental illness.  Fundamental aspects of pharmacological actions of major classes of psychopharmaceutical agents (antipsychotics, antidepressants, antianxiety agents, mood stabilizers, hypnotics, stimulants, and cognitive enhancers), including neurotransmitter/neuromodulator receptor agonist and antagonist effects, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics, will be presented.  Comparisons of therapeutic effects among drugs in each class will be discussed in detail.  Drug-drug interactions, both among psychopharmacologic agents and between these agents and other classes of drugs, major adverse events, and frequent side effects also will be discussed in detail. The genetic underpinnings of drug metabolism and interactions and their effects on therapeutic response, discussed briefly in the PGY1 seminars, will be revisited.  The concept of evidence-based medicine will be considered with each class of medication discussed; e.g., the strength of therapeutic effect versus placebo and comparison drugs and the strength of drug-drug interactions as established in the medical literature.  Case presentations will emphasize practical application of theory in the use of all classes of psychotropic medications.  32 hours (8 sessions).
  • Advanced Topics in the Psychotherapies; Seminars and Case Conferences  – Leslie Horton MD, PhD, Ronald Bale PhD, Ronda Doonan PsyD, Daniel Powell MA, LMFT
    Major psychological theories and therapeutic approaches, including their evidence base, will be discussed, including ego psychology, separation/individuation, behavior/learning and behavioral therapies (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy), psychodynamic psychology and psychoanalytic therapy.  Residents will learn to develop a psychodynamic formulation and combine psychopharmacology with psychotherapy.  Therapeutic techniques to improve compliance with treatment in vulnerable patients (e.g., those with poor social support systems) will be emphasized.  In the context of various outpatient clinic rotations, the effects of racism, poverty, addiction, discrimination, and other social determinants of health on patients’ mental health and psychosocial growth will be addressed in therapy. Psychosocial rehabilitation and community-based programs; e.g., those that address homelessness in Ventura County, and therapies and programs adapted for co-occurring addiction and mental illness, will be important considerations.  Mindfulness techniques, spirituality, and the role of the arts in mental health will be integrated into the curriculum.  Case presentations will emphasize practical application of theory and treatment techniques.  32 hours (8 sessions).
  • Couples, Family, and Group Therapies – Daniel Powell MA, LMFT
    Extensions of individual psychotherapies incorporate inclusion of the “significant other” in couples therapy, more family members; e.g., children, when there is a shared family issue, and inclusion of a patient in a group that offers particular leverage; e.g., support, insightful challenge, in the psychotherapeutic process.  Indications for use of these modalities will be discussed, and residents will be offered opportunities for conducting these therapies with selected patients.  16 hours (4 sessions).
  • Cultural Psychiatry – Leslie Horton MD, PhD
    Different cultures and communities exhibit distress and explain symptoms in different ways (idioms of distress), and residents need to be aware of relevant contextual information stemming from a patient’s culture, race, ethnicity, religion and geographical origin.  Ventura County has a large agricultural presence and a significant Hispanic population.  Cultural aspects of presentation of psychiatric illness, diagnosis, interactions with patients’ families, approaches to both biological and psychological treatments, and development of a long-term therapeutic clinician-patient relationship will be considered for the major cultures represented in Ventura County.  Residents will have the opportunity to explore the uses and understanding of the term culture as it relates to health, illness and healing.  12 hours (3 sessions).
  • Community and Social Psychiatry – Jantje Groot MD, other faculty and outside experts
    Psychosocial rehabilitation models and community-based programs, such as the ASSIST and ACT programs addressing the epidemic of homelessness in Ventura County, and community-based treatment programs, specifically targeting co-occurring addiction and mental health issues, will be important considerations.  Non-medical community treatment programs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous and analogous programs for narcotic addiction, will be discussed.  Field trips to meetings of these community resources will be planned as scheduling permits.  12 hours (3 sessions).
  • Forensic Psychiatry – Joseph Vlaskovits MD
    The purpose is to provide an overview of the development of laws governing the involuntary detention of psychiatric patients, their culpability in criminal proceedings, legal competency of patients with cognitive impairment, the status of California institutions for psychiatric patients convicted of law violations, and the interface of legal and medical authority over these patients.  Residents will be afforded opportunities for psychiatric evaluation of persons facing legal questions in all the aforementioned areas.  12 hours (3 sessions).
  • Research Methods and Issues – Robert Rubin MD, PhD
    What constitutes research; i.e., the development of new knowledge, is the primary focus.  The presentation of new knowledge to others, in oral and/or written form, is emphasized as a sine qua non for research endeavors.  Research is broadly defined, ranging from literature reviews to laboratory projects, and includes both human and animal studies.  Elements of sound research practice; e.g., experimental methods and data analysis, will be discussed in detail, as will ethics in research.  Contemporary examples of research malfeasance and consequences will be presented as cautionary tales.  Residents’ quality improvement projects, initiated at least conceptually in PGY2, will be discussed in detail, so that they can be presented in Grand Rounds during the resident’s PGY4 year.  40 hours (10 sessions).
  • Professional Development / Transition to Practice – All faculty.
    The emphasis of this residency program is on training psychiatrists to meet the needs of Ventura County mental health programs.  As such, the role of the psychiatrist in these programs will be considered from the standpoint of both practicing clinician and administrator/team leader.  This seminar series will be carried through all four postgraduate years, with greater frequency in PGY4 year.  In later years, post-residency opportunities in public institutions and clinics will be discussed in detail, including both clinical and administrative positions.  As well, opportunities and challenges in private practice, academic and educational settings, and careers in basic and clinical research will be considered.  20 hours (5 sessions).
  • PRITE Review Course – All faculty.  16 hours (4 sessions).

PGY4 Seminars

The PGY4 year is 50% consultation-liaison (C/L) psychiatry and 50% electives.  This year affords the opportunity to include seminars, in addition to C/L psychiatry, on special topics of interest that are not necessarily aligned with residents’ clinical rotations.  All require compulsory attendance.  As the residency progresses, elective PGY4 seminars will be added, based on residents’ interests and experiences.

  • Advanced Topics in Consultation-Liaison (C/L) Psychiatry; Seminars and Case Conferences – Theodore Huzyk, MD, Joseph Vlaskovits MD, Jason Cooper MD
    The purpose is to provide an in-depth presentation of the consultative help that psychiatrists can provide to patients hospitalized on non-psychiatric services and referred as outpatients from non-psychiatric clinicians.  Psychiatric illnesses in medically ill patients are the prime consideration in C/L psychiatry and will form the core subject of this series.  DSM diagnostic categories for major mental illnesses secondary to medical illness and/or treatment will be discussed in detail, and those mental illnesses most often associated with particular organ system diseases will be considered.  Special aspects of C/L psychiatry; e.g., consultation for pain syndromes, organ transplantation, palliative care, and C/L services for hospitalized children and adolescents, will be discussed.  As with the PGY2 C/L presentations, a major emphasis will be the interaction of the psychiatrist with all members of the clinical team – non-psychiatric physicians, ward nurses, medical social workers, et al. – in terms of education about mental issues in general and therapeutic approaches to specific patients.  36 hours (9 sessions).
  • Administrative/Leadership Psychiatry – Joseph Vlaskovits MD, Robert Rubin MD, PhD, Brian Taylor MD, Jason Cooper MD
    The role of the psychiatrist as multidisciplinary mental health team leader will be developed in detail.  Particular emphasis will be on the complementary roles of mental health professionals, and how to ensure productive working relationships while minimizing tensions among mental health specialties; e.g., whether psychologists should be privileged to prescribe psychotropic medication.  The administrative psychiatrist as arbiter of legal issues of involving patients, psychiatrist practice competencies, etc. will be emphasized. The professional satisfactions of being an administrative psychiatrist will be discussed.  48 hours (12 sessions).
  • Extraordinary Psychiatric Disorders – Leslie Horton MD, PhD, Robert Rubin MD, PhD
    Rare psychiatric syndromes with which the psychiatrist needs to have some familiarity can occur in all ethnic groups; e.g., Munchausen and Capgras syndromes.  These will be discussed briefly, as will the more common culturally related syndromes, which can present diagnostic and treatment challenges, e.g., psychiatric symptoms in prisoners of war, possession states/exorcism, and “hystero-psychoses” (latah, windigo, etc.).  12 hours (3 sessions).
  • Forensic Psychiatry – Joseph Vlaskovits MD
    These sessions are a continuation of the Forensic Psychiatry seminars in PGY3 year.  The purpose is to provide an overview of the development of laws governing involuntary detention of psychiatric patients, their culpability in criminal proceedings, legal competency of patients with cognitive impairment, the status of California institutions for psychiatric patients convicted of law violations, and the interface of legal and medical authority over these patients.  Residents will be afforded opportunities for psychiatric evaluation of persons facing legal questions in all the aforementioned areas.  12 hours (3 sessions).
  • History of Psychiatry – Leslie Horton MD, PhD, Robert Rubin MD, PhD
    The development of thought on the nature and treatment of psychiatric illness from pre-Greek and Roman times through the present will be briefly surveyed.  Emphasis will be on the events of the 20th and 21st centuries that continue to impact contemporary psychiatric practice.  Inter alia, concepts of institutionalization, past somatic treatments, and mind-body dualism and its resolution will be considered.  The historical antecedents of key developments in psychiatric practice; e.g., ECT, lithium, psychodynamic psychotherapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy, will be discussed.  8 hours (2 sessions).
  • Human Sexuality– Leslie Horton MD, PhD, outside experts
    The purpose is to provide an in-depth consideration of sexual function and dysfunction, including disorders of sexual desire and gender dysphoria.  Societal concerns about gender identity will be emphasized; e.g., consideration of the LBGTQ movement.  How individuals identify themselves in contemporary terms; e.g., gender-fluid, and what these identities mean for individuals’ psychology, will be discussed.  12 hours (3 sessions).
  • Hypnosis, Biofeedback, Acupuncture, and Relaxation Treatment Techniques – Outside experts.
    A survey of these techniques will be undertaken, with discussion of which patients and conditions might benefit from their inclusion as diagnostic aids; e.g., hypnosis, and as treatment modalities.  8 hours (2 sessions).
  • Professional Development / Transition to Practice – All faculty.
    The emphasis of this residency program is on training psychiatrists to meet the needs of Ventura County mental health programs.  As such, the role of the psychiatrist in these programs will be considered from the standpoint of both practicing clinician and administrator/team leader.  This seminar series will be carried through all four postgraduate years, with greater frequency in PGY4 year.  In later years, post-residency opportunities in public institutions and clinics will be discussed in detail, including both clinical and administrative positions.  Opportunities and challenges in private practice, academic and educational settings, and careers in basic and clinical research will be considered.  40 hours (10 sessions).
  • PRITE Review Course – All faculty.  16 hours (4 sessions).

Conferences

Conferences are open to psychiatry residents in all four years.  All require compulsory attendance.

  • Department of Psychiatry Grand Rounds
    Grand Rounds initially will be held on a quarterly basis and will be increased in frequency as the residency develops. Topics will be chosen to complement and build upon foundational knowledge residents obtain in their seminars.  Both teaching faculty and outside speakers with specialized expertise will be invited as presenters.  As the residency program progresses and PGY4 residents complete their professional competency and other research projects, they will be invited to present their findings.  Grand Rounds will be open to all professionals providing mental health care, and presentations will be sufficiently broad to be appreciated by all attendees.
  • Residents’ Journal Club
    Journal Club will be held monthly. All teaching faculty will participate as discussants.  A contemporary or historical article or book chapter will be chosen to illustrate a particular aspect of critical thinking about the scientific literature; e.g., clinical trials, statistical analysis, single case studies, objectivity in assessing research results, and ethics of publication.  Our quantitative research faculty will be invited periodically to focus on the practical interpretation of statistics, tables, and graphs.  Residents will present articles and lead the discussion with residents and faculty.
  • Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) Conference

This conference will be held quarterly, in conjunction with the Ventura County Behavioral Health Quality Assurance Department.  The M&M conference is interdisciplinary, with participation by all mental health (and other) professionals involved with the clinical situation under consideration.  Patients and clinical situations considered will be those that exemplify a less-than-desired outcome, be it from deficiencies in care or system weaknesses.  An approach will be taken that ascertains the most basic level of deficiencies that require remediation, and specific remediations will be recommended.